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Collection last updated: Jun 4 2021
Engine last updated: May 18 2021
Finnegans Wake lines: 36
Elucidations found: 178

010.01of the lipoleums, Toffeethief, that spy on the Willingdone from
010.01+Variants: {FnF, Vkg, JCM: ...lipoleums, Toffeethief...} | {Png: ...lipoleums. Toffeethief...}
010.01+nursery rhyme Taffy was a Welshman, Taffy was a Thief
010.01+[249.29]
010.01+Battle of Spion Kop, 1900 (Cluster: Battles)
010.02his big white harse, the Capeinhope. Stonewall Willingdone
010.02+Wellington's horse Copenhagen (was not white) [008.17] [008.21] [.11] [.13] [.21]
010.02+Cape of Good Hope
010.02+Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson: American Confederate general
010.03is an old maxy montrumeny. Lipoleums is nice hung bushel-
010.03+Greek mache: battle (the Greek letter chi looks like an x)
010.03+Slang maxie: big mistake
010.03+maxim
010.03+matrimony
010.03+one too many
010.03+Slang hung: (of a man) having large genitals
010.03+young bachelors
010.03+bushel
010.04lors. This is hiena hinnessy laughing alout at the Willing-
010.04+phrase laugh like a hyena: laugh hysterically
010.04+Pont d'Iena, Paris (Cluster: Bridges in Paris)
010.04+Battle of Jena-Auerstedt, 1806 (Napoleon's victory over the Prussians) (Cluster: Battles)
010.04+Motif: dark/fair [.04-.06]
010.04+Irish fhionn: fair (pronounced 'hin'; *V*) [.05-.06]
010.04+Irish Ó Fhionnghusa: descendant of Fionnghus ('fair choice')
010.04+Mr Dooley and Mr Hennessy: American-Irish characters created by the American humourist Finley Peter Dunne (appearing in hundreds of 'Mr Dooley' sketches from the late 1890s; 'Hennessy' is usually spelled 'Hinnissy' when addressed by Mr Dooley)
010.04+aloud
010.04+(like a lout)
010.04+a lot
010.04+(Lipoleum)
010.05done. This is lipsyg dooley krieging the funk from the hinnessy.
010.05+Battle of Leipzig, 1813 (Napoleon's defeat by the Prussians and their allies) (Cluster: Battles)
010.05+Danish syg: sick
010.05+William Jerome and Jean Schwartz: song Mister Dooley (1902): 'Napoleon had an army of a hundred thousand men... And though Napoleon marched them up who was it called them down 'Twas Mister Dooley' (mentioned in Ellmann: James Joyce 341, 423-425)
010.05+Irish dubh: dark (pronounced 'dhoo'; *C*) [.04]
010.05+Irish Ó Dubhlaoich: descendant of Dubhlaoch ('black warrior')
010.05+German Krieg: war
010.05+German kriegen: to get
010.05+(making fun)
010.05+Middle English funk: spark
010.06This is the hinndoo Shimar Shin between the dooley boy and the
010.06+Irish fhionndubh: fair-dark (pronounced 'hindhoo'; *Y*) [.04]
010.06+hinnessy/dooley [.04-.05]
010.06+Hindu (Wellington served in India prior to his Napoleonic campaigns)
010.06+Motif: Shem/Shaun
010.06+Irish siomar sin: trefoil, shamrock
010.06+Hindustani Samar Singh: typical name for a soldier (literally 'lion in battle')
010.07hinnessy. Tip. This is the wixy old Willingdone picket up the
010.07+Motif: Tip
010.07+wily, foxy
010.07+Slang waxy: angry
010.07+picket: a detachment of soldiers serving as a lookout for approaching enemies
010.07+G.E. Pickett: American Confederate general
010.07+picking up
010.08half of the threefoiled hat of lipoleums fromoud of the bluddle
010.08+trefoil (shamrock)
010.08+defiled
010.08+from out
010.08+bloody
010.08+battlefield
010.08+puddle
010.09filth. This is the hinndoo waxing ranjymad for a bombshoob.
010.09+waxing raging mad
010.09+bombshell
010.09+Slang pumpship: urinate
010.10This is the Willingdone hanking the half of the hat of lipoleums
010.10+hanging
010.11up the tail on the buckside of his big white harse. Tip. That was
010.11+(wipe his or his horse's arse with the hat)
010.11+backside
010.11+white horse [008.17] [008.21] [.02] [.13] [.21]
010.11+Motif: Tip
010.12the last joke of Willingdone. Hit, hit, hit! This is the same white
010.12+Last Duke of Wellington [009.14-.15]
010.12+it (Cluster: Pronouns)
010.12+Latin ita: yes (Cluster: Yes)
010.13harse of the Willingdone, Culpenhelp, waggling his tailoscrupp
010.13+Wellington's horse Copenhagen (was not white) [008.17] [008.21] [.02] [.11] [.21]
010.13+Variants: {FnF, Vkg, JCM: ...Willingdone, Culpenhelp...} | {Png: ...Willingdone. Culpenhelp...}
010.13+Latin culpa: fault (Motif: O felix culpa! (Exsultet))
010.13+Slang tail: buttocks; penis
010.13+telescope
010.13+crupper: the rump of a horse
010.14with the half of a hat of lipoleums to insoult on the hinndoo see-
010.14+insult
010.14+Latin insulto: I jump
010.14+Iseult
010.14+Marshal Soult: French chief of staff at Waterloo
010.14+(voyeur)
010.14+Anglo-Indian sepoy: an Indian soldier in the service of a foreign army, usually British (Napoleon called Wellington 'a general of sepoys')
010.15boy. Hney, hney, hney! (Bullsrag! Foul!) This is the seeboy,
010.15+Czech hnúj: Ruthenian hnii: dung
010.15+Houyhnhnms: a race of intelligent horses in Swift: Gulliver's Travels
010.15+they (Cluster: Pronouns, but no 'we')
010.15+Greek nai: yes (Cluster: Yes, but no 'oui')
010.15+Marshal Ney: French commander of the left wing at Waterloo
010.15+neigh
010.15+[008.15] [009.24] [.21]
010.16madrashattaras, upjump and pumpim, cry to the Willingdone:
010.16+phrase mad as a hatter
010.16+The Encyclopædia Britannica vol. XVII, 'Madras', 292a: (of the city of Madras) 'in 1741 the Mahrattas unsuccessfully attacked the place' (Cluster: Battles)
010.16+Wellington fought in the second Anglo-Mahratta War, 1803 (Cluster: Battles)
010.16+Motif: Up, guards, and at them!
010.17Ap Pukkaru! Pukka Yurap! This is the Willingdone, bornstable
010.17+Battle of Aboukir Bay, 1798 (Cluster: Battles)
010.17+Anglo-Indian pukkaroo: seize!
010.17+Anglo-Indian pukka: certain, reliable, authentic, proper
010.17+bugger yourself!
010.17+Wellington, asked if he were Irish: 'If a gentleman happens to be born in a stable, it does not follow that he should be called a horse'
010.17+Thackeray: Lectures on the English Humorists: 'If Swift was an Irishman then a man who is born in a stable is a horse' (Swift)
010.17+Motif: The Letter: born gentleman
010.18ghentleman, tinders his maxbotch to the cursigan Shimar Shin.
010.18+Ghent: city in Belgium (after the battle of Waterloo, it became part of the Netherlands for fifteen years)
010.18+tenders his matchbox
010.18+tinderbox (to light bomb)
010.18+Greek mache: battle (the Greek letter chi looks like an x)
010.18+botch
010.18+cursing
010.18+Corsican (Napoleon was)
010.19Basucker youstead! This is the dooforhim seeboy blow the whole
010.19+Battle of Busaco, 1810 (Wellington) (Cluster: Battles)
010.19+go bugger yourself!
010.19+Spanish usted: you (formal)
010.19+dooley/hinnessy [.04-.05]
010.19+Colloquial do for: to injure fatally, to kill, to ruin
010.19+Lord Dufferin: famous 19th century British diplomat, including Viceroy of India
010.19+(blow bomb)
010.19+(farting or defecation)
010.19+(rhythm of nursery rhyme The House That Jack Built)
010.20of the half of the hat of lipoleums off of the top of the tail on the
010.20+
010.21back of his big wide harse. Tip (Bullseye! Game!) How Copen-
010.21+Wellington's horse Copenhagen (was not white) [008.17] [008.21] [.02] [.11] [.13]
010.21+Motif: Tip
010.21+[008.15] [009.24] [.15]
010.21+eye [009.24]
010.21+HCE (Motif: HCE)
010.21+Battle of Copenhagen, 1801 (Cluster: Battles)
010.22hagen ended. This way the museyroom. Mind your boots goan
010.22+[008.09]
010.22+was
010.22+(death, feet first)
010.22+going
010.23out.
010.23+
010.24     Phew!
010.24+{{Synopsis: I.1.1B.A: [010.24-011.28]: the battle is over — a gnarlybird collecting spoiled goods}}
010.25     What a warm time we were in there but how keling is here the
010.25+(long time)
010.25+cooling
010.25+killing
010.26airabouts! We nowhere she lives but you mussna tell annaone for
010.26+air
010.26+whereabouts
010.26+know where
010.26+must not tell anyone
010.26+phrase for the love of Jesus
010.27the lamp of Jig-a-Lanthern! It's a candlelittle houthse of a month
010.27+lamp, lantern, candle
010.27+Jack O'Lantern: a will-o'-the-wisp, something misleading
010.27+candlelit
010.27+Castletown House, County Kildare, was said to have a window for each day of the year [024.09]
010.27+Howth
010.27+a thousand and one (The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night)
010.27+(February has 28 days, and one more on leap years) (Motif: 28-29) [.29]
010.28and one windies. Downadown, High Downadown. And num-
010.28+windows
010.28+windy
010.28+song The Three Ravens: 'Down in yonder green field Down a down hey down hey down There lies a knight slain 'neath his shield'
010.28+German Nummer: number
010.29mered quaintlymine. And such reasonable weather too! The wa-
010.29+twenty-nine (Motif: 28-29) [.27]
010.29+seasonable
010.29+Battle of Wagram, 1809 (Napoleon) (Cluster: Battles)
010.29+vagrant
010.30grant wind's awalt'zaround the piltdowns and on every blasted
010.30+a-waltz around
010.30+VI.B.1.050e (r): 'Piltdown man (Sussex)' (only first two words crayoned)
010.30+VI.B.1.173f (r): '150,000 Piltdown (Sussex)' (only second word crayoned)
010.30+Piltdown Man (existence surmised from pieces of a supposedly-prehistoric skull apparently found in 1912 near Piltdown Common, Sussex, England; proved to be fraudulent in 1953)
010.30+downs: open grassy country
010.30+blasted: blighted, withered; cursed, damned
010.31knollyrock (if you can spot fifty I spy four more) there's that
010.31+knoll and rock
010.31+Roman numeral LIV: fifty-four [011.05]
010.31+Fomorians: mythical Irish colonists
010.32gnarlybird ygathering, a runalittle, doalittle, preealittle, pouralittle,
010.32+early bird (*A*)
010.32+one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten, eleven, twelve
010.32+pray
010.33wipealittle, kicksalittle, severalittle, eatalittle, whinealittle, kenalittle,
010.33+
010.34helfalittle, pelfalittle gnarlybird. A verytableland of bleakbardfields!
010.34+German helfen: to help
010.34+German elf: eleven
010.34+William Shakespeare: King Henry V II.3.16: in the description of Falstaff's death, the original 'a table of greene fields' was amended to 'a babbl'd of green fields'
010.34+veritable tableland
010.34+Battle of the Field of Blackbirds, 1389 (better known as Battle of Kosovo; from Serbo-Croatian kosovo polje: blackbirds' field) (Cluster: Battles)
010.35Under his seven wrothschields lies one, Lumproar. His glav toside
010.35+the seven "sheaths" (physical, astral, mental, buddhic, nirvanic, anupadakic, and adic) which clothe the essence of the soul, according to some esoteric writings
010.35+Rothschild: a famous Jewish banking family (from German Archaic zum rothen Schild: with the red shield)
010.35+German Lump: scoundrel
010.35+French L'empereur: The emperor
010.35+Archaic glave: sword
010.35+Russian glava: head
010.35+beside
010.36him. Skud ontorsed. Our pigeons pair are flewn for northcliffs.
010.36+Danish skud: a gun-shot
010.36+Danish skjold: shield
010.36+unhorsed
010.36+endorsed
010.36+torso
010.36+(*IJ*)
010.36+pigeon pair: boy and girl twins
010.36+Motif: dove/raven (pigeons, crows [011.01])
010.36+flown
010.36+Alfred Northcliffe: Irish newspaper magnate, born in Chapelizod


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