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Collection last updated: Jun 4 2021
Engine last updated: May 18 2021
Finnegans Wake lines: 36
Elucidations found: 149

160.01boles clean, — the weeping beeches, Picea and Tillia, are in a
160.01+Fitzpatrick: The Trees of Ireland 635: 'Taxus baccata... Yew trees are a feature in many of the old established demesnes such as Muckross, Castlemartyr 54' x 7'11" with a clean bole to 20''
160.01+bowels
160.01+Fitzpatrick: The Trees of Ireland 646: 'Fagus sylvatica... var. pendula... There are beautiful examples of the Weeping Beech at Curraghchase and Rostrevor'
160.01+Weeping Bitch (Canicula): a medieval folktale about the transformation of a girl into a bitch
160.01+Fitzpatrick: The Trees of Ireland 621: 'PICEA' (the genus Spruce)
160.01+Fitzpatrick: The Trees of Ireland 655: 'TILIA' (the genus Lime)
160.02wild state about it — ought to be classified, as Cricketbutt Will-
160.02+Fitzpatrick: The Trees of Ireland 610: 'Abies venusta... This tree has an extremely limited range in the wild state' ('wild state' appears several more times in Fitzpatrick: The Trees of Ireland)
160.02+Fitzpatrick: The Trees of Ireland 654: 'Salix cocrulea... The Cricket-bat Willow'
160.03owm and his two nurserymen advisers suggested, under genus
160.03+Fitzpatrick: The Trees of Ireland 643: 'Corylus colurna... a tree was planted by Robertson, a nurseryman at Kilkenny'
160.03+Norsemen
160.03+hymen
160.03+Fitzpatrick: The Trees of Ireland 607: 'Abies grandis... this tree... is the most vigorous of the genus'
160.04Inexhaustible when we refloat upon all the butternat, sweet gum
160.04+reflect
160.04+Fitzpatrick: The Trees of Ireland 647: 'Juglans cinerea... The Butternut'
160.04+Dutch nat: wet; moisture
160.04+Fitzpatrick: The Trees of Ireland 648: 'Liquidamber styraciflua... The Sweet Gum'
160.05and manna ash redcedera which is so purvulent there as if there
160.05+Fitzpatrick: The Trees of Ireland 646: 'Fraxinus ornus.. The Flowering or Manna Ash'
160.05+Fitzpatrick: The Trees of Ireland 636: 'Thuja plicata... The Western Red Cedar'
160.05+etcetera
160.05+Italian edera: ivy
160.05+prevalent
160.06was howthorns in Curraghchasa which ought to look as plane
160.06+Howth
160.06+Fitzpatrick: The Trees of Ireland 643: 'Crataegus monogyna... the common native hawthorn in Ireland'
160.06+Fitzpatrick: The Trees of Ireland 646: 'Fagus sylvatica... var. pendula... There are beautiful examples of the Weeping Beech at Curraghchase and Rostrevor'
160.06+Curraghchase: the 17th-20th century estate of the de Vere family (notably poets and politicians) in County Limerick, famous for its magnificent woods (including, but not especially, hawthorns) and its hawfinches (an otherwise rare bird in Ireland)
160.06+The Curragh: a flat open plain in County Kildare, famous for its military base and its horse racecourse
160.06+Modern Greek karakaxa: magpie, ugly woman
160.06+phrase as plain as a pikestaff
160.06+Fitzpatrick: The Trees of Ireland 649: 'Platanus acerifolia... The London Plane... is by far the commonest of the three planes in cultivation'
160.07as a lodgepole to anybody until we are introduced to that pine-
160.07+Fitzpatrick: The Trees of Ireland 626: 'Pinus contorta... The Lodgepole Pine'
160.07+Fitzpatrick: The Trees of Ireland 597: 'the oldest introduced tree in Ireland is an English Elm still standing at Howth Castle' ('introduced' appears several more times in Fitzpatrick: The Trees of Ireland)
160.07+Fitzpatrick: The Trees of Ireland 599: 'After 1840 conifers became the fashion... many pineta were established'
160.07+pineta: plantations or collections of pine-trees of various species (plural of 'pinetum')
160.07+Italian pinacoteca: painting-gallery (especially, that of the Vatican)
160.08tacotta of Verney Rubeus where the deodarty is pinctured for us
160.08+terra-cotta
160.08+Vernet: the name of four 18th-19th century French painters (four generations of the same family)
160.08+Fitzpatrick: The Trees of Ireland 651: 'Populus vernirubens... remarkable for its brilliant red leaves in early summer' (Latin verni rubeus: russet-leaved)
160.08+Peter Paul Rubens: 17th century Flemish painter
160.08+song Under the Deodar (from the 1902 musical play A Country Girl, with music composed by Lionel Monckton and Paul Rubens, although this specific song was composed by Monckton)
160.08+Fitzpatrick: The Trees of Ireland 612: 'Cedrus deodara... The Deodar is an important timber tree in the western Himalayas'
160.08+Motif: Dear Dirty Dublin
160.08+Greek theodartê: struck by God
160.08+Latin pingere: to paint
160.08+pictured
160.08+tinctured
160.09in a pure stand, which we do not doubt ha has a habitat of doing,
160.09+Fitzpatrick: The Trees of Ireland 605: 'Abies balsamea... is found in pure stands or mixed with other conifers'
160.09+pure stand of timber: in forestry, trees growing in seclusion from other species
160.09+German Stand: condition
160.09+(Motif: stuttering)
160.09+he has
160.09+habit
160.09+Fitzpatrick: The Trees of Ireland 611: 'Athrotaxis laxifolia... has a habitat similar to A. cupressoides'
160.10but without those selfsownseedlings which are a species of proof
160.10+Fitzpatrick: The Trees of Ireland 615: 'Cupressus macrocarpa... Specimens have been measured at... Muckross 52' x 2'11", with self-sown seedlings beneath'
160.10+Fitzpatrick: The Trees of Ireland 597: 'The mildness of the Irish climate makes possible the cultivation of a wide range of tree species' ('species' appears several more times in Fitzpatrick: The Trees of Ireland)
160.11that the largest individual can occur at or in an olivetion such as
160.11+Fitzpatrick: The Trees of Ireland 611: 'Araucaria araucana... splendid avenues of these trees at Powerscourt and Woodstock, the largest individuals being 64' x 7'4" and 61' x 6'5" respectively'
160.11+Latin olivetum: olive grove
160.11+Fitzpatrick: The Trees of Ireland 616: 'Cupressus nootkatensis... In its southern range it occurs mostly between 2,000 and 5,000 feet elevation'
160.12East Conna Hillock where it mixes with foolth accacians and
160.12+ECH (Motif: HCE)
160.12+Fitzpatrick: The Trees of Ireland 634: 'Sequoia sempervirens... Good specimens are at... Old Conna Hill'
160.12+Old Conna Hill, near Bray
160.12+Cornish conna: the neck
160.12+Irish conadh: firewood
160.12+Fitzpatrick: The Trees of Ireland 654: 'Robinia pseudoacacia.. The False Acacia'
160.12+Acacians: followers of Acacius, bishop of Cesarea, or Acasius, patriarch of Constantinople
160.13common sallies and is tender) Vux Populus, as we say in hickory-
160.13+Fitzpatrick: The Trees of Ireland 654: 'Salix caprea... The Common Sallow'
160.13+Fitzpatrick: The Trees of Ireland 611: 'Athrotaxis laxifolia... is tender'
160.13+Latin vox populi: voice of the people
160.13+Fitzpatrick: The Trees of Ireland 650: 'POPULUS' (the genus Poplar)
160.13+Fitzpatrick: The Trees of Ireland 642: 'Carya alba... this Hickory was introduced in 1629'
160.13+nursery rhyme Hickory Dickory Dock
160.13+Latin hic, hoc: this (masculine, neuter, respectively)
160.13+history
160.14hockery and I wish we had some more glasses of arbor vitae.
160.14+German höckerig: hunchbacked
160.14+Fitzpatrick: The Trees of Ireland 636: 'Thuja plicata... The Western Red Cedar or Arbor vitae'
160.14+aqua vitae: brandy, spirits
160.15Why roat by the roadside or awn over alum pot? Alderman
160.15+root
160.15+Fitzpatrick: The Trees of Ireland 640: 'Aesculus carnea... planted as a roadside tree'
160.15+French aune: alder
160.15+mourn
160.15+elm
160.15+Fitzpatrick: The Trees of Ireland 640: 'Alnus glutinosa... The Common Alder'
160.16Whitebeaver is dakyo. He ought to go away for a change of
160.16+Fitzpatrick: The Trees of Ireland 652: 'Pyrus aria... The Whitebeam'
160.16+Japanese daikyo: scoundrel
160.16+Greek dikaios: just
160.16+Fitzpatrick: The Trees of Ireland 597: 'The next foreign trees recorded are a Sycamore... and an Evergreen Oak'
160.16+oak
160.16+O.K.
160.17ideas and he'd have a world of things to look back on. Do, sweet
160.17+Variants: {FnF, Vkg, JCM: ...Do, sweet...} | {Png: ...Do sweet...}
160.18Daniel! If I weren't a jones in myself I'd elect myself to be his
160.18+Daniel Jones: An English Pronouncing Dictionary
160.18+Jonah 1:15-17: Jonah was thrown off a ship (to calm the sea) and was saved by a god-sent great fish (trditionally, a whale), that swallowed him [.19]
160.19dolphin in the wildsbillow because he is such a barefooted rubber
160.19+in Greek mythology, Arion jumped off a ship (to escape pirates) and was saved by a god-sent dolphin [.18]
160.19+wild billows (Jonah was thrown overboard to calm the tempestuous sea) [.18]
160.19+whale's belly (Jonah spent there three days and nights) [.18]
160.19+wheelbarrow
160.19+barefaced robber [.20]
160.20with my supersocks pulled over his face which I publicked in
160.20+Slang phrase give (one) socks: give (one) a sound beating
160.20+(stocking mask on robber's face) [.19]
160.21my bestback garden for the laetification of siderodromites and
160.21+Latin laetificatio: gladdening
160.21+edification
160.21+Latin sidereus: starry
160.21+Greek sidêro: iron
160.21+Modern Greek sidêrodromos: railroad
160.21+dromite: kind of meteorite (meteorites often contain iron)
160.21+Greek dromeus: runner
160.21+Greek dromos: road, orbit
160.22to the irony of the stars. You will say it is most unenglish and
160.22+iron
160.22+Wyndham Lewis said that the Circe episode of James Joyce: Ulysses was indebted to his play Enemy of the Stars [155.19]
160.22+James Joyce: Ulysses.17.2226: 'the apathy of the stars' (after urination in Bloom's back garden)
160.23I shall hope to hear that you will not be wrong about it. But I
160.23+
160.24further, feeling a bit husky in my truths.
160.24+falter
160.24+throat
160.25     Will you please come over and let us mooremoore murgessly
160.25+{{Synopsis: I.6.4.B: [160.25-160.34]: let us murmur — for the four are listening}}
160.25+murmur
160.25+George Moore: Confessions of a Young Man
160.25+Moore and Burgess minstrels
160.26to each's other down below our vices. I am underheerd by old
160.26+voices
160.26+(*X*)
160.26+overheard
160.27billfaust. Wilsh is full of curks. The coolskittle is philip debli-
160.27+Motif: 4 provinces [.27-.28]
160.27+Belfast (Ulster)
160.27+German Faust: fist (red hand of Ulster)
160.27+VI.B.14.199h (b): 'Walsh is full of corks'
160.27+Cork is full of Walshs (Walsh is a common surname in Cork, but is even more so in several counties of southern and western Ireland)
160.27+Cork (Munster)
160.27+coalscuttle is full of
160.27+James Joyce: Ulysses.15.2261: 'behind the coalscuttle... the bearded figure of Mananaun MacLir'
160.27+Greek philippos: horse-lover
160.27+Dublin (Leinster)
160.27+lignite: a type of coal
160.28nite. Mr Wist is thereover beyeind the wantnot. Wilsh and wist
160.28+Galway is in the west of Ireland (Connacht)
160.28+Dialect beyind: beyond
160.28+whatnot: stand with shelves
160.29are as thick of thins udder as faust on the deblinite. Sgunoshooto
160.29+phrase thick as thieves
160.29+sick of each other
160.29+of
160.29+Italian sconosciuto: unknown
160.30estas preter la tapizo malgranda. Lilegas al si en sia chambro.
160.30+Esperanto S estas preter la tapiso malgranda. Li legas al si en sia cambro: S is beyond the small carpet. He reads to himself in his room
160.31Kelkefoje funcktas, kelkefoje srumpas Shultroj. Houdian Kiel vi
160.31+Esperanto Kelkefoje funkcias, kelkefoje srumpas sultrojn. Hodiau kiel vi fartas, mia nigra sinjoro?: Sometimes functions, sometimes shrinks shoulders. Today how are you doing, my black sir? (Motif: How are you today, my dark/fair sir?)
160.32fartas, mia nigra sinjoro? And from the poignt of fun where I
160.32+point of view
160.33am crying to arrive you at they are on allfore as foibleminded as
160.33+trying
160.33+(take you)
160.33+phrase be on all fours: be similar in all respects
160.33+four (*X*)
160.33+foible
160.33+feebleminded
160.34you can feel they are fablebodied.
160.34+fable
160.34+ablebodied
160.35     My heeders will recoil with a great leisure how at the out-
160.35+{{Synopsis: I.6.4.C: [160.35-161.14]: some more proofs — which reminds him of Burrus and Caseous}}
160.35+my readers will recall with a great pleasure
160.36break before trespassing on the space question where even
160.36+newspaper correspondence columns: 'may I trespass on your space'


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