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Collection last updated: Jun 4 2021
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Finnegans Wake lines: 36
Elucidations found: 326

338.01Order, order, order! Milster Malster in the chair. We've heard it
338.01+malster: malt-maker
338.01+phrase in the flesh: in person [455.23]
338.01+French chair: flesh
338.01+song Ireland Boys, Hurrah: 'We've heard her faults a hundred times'
338.01+since
338.02sinse sung thousandtimes. How Burghley shuck the rackushant
338.02+(Ellmann: James Joyce 398: (of James Joyce) 'Buckley, he explained, was an Irish soldier in the Crimean War who drew a bead on a Russian general, but when he observed his splendid epaulettes and decorations, he could not bring himself to shoot. After a moment, alive to his duty, he raised his rifle again, but just then the general let down his pants to defecate. The sight of his enemy in so helpless and human a plight was too much for Buckley, who again lowered his gun. But when the general prepared to finish the operation with a piece of grassy turf, Buckley lost all respect for him and fired')
338.02+Motif: How Buckley shot the Russian General (i.e. *Y* assaulting *E*)
338.02+Lord Burghley: 16th century English statesman, involved in suppressing Catholic recusants under Elizabeth I
338.02+Cecil Buckley: 19th century young British naval lieutenant, leader of a number of dangerous secret landing missions against the Russians in the Crimean war, for which he received the Victoria Cross
338.02+'Who struck Buckley?': a catch-phrase used in the 19th century to annoy Irishmen
338.02+Czech Rakusan: an Austrian
338.02+recusant: one who refuses to submit, especially Catholics refusing to Attend Church of England services
338.03Germanon. For Ehren, boys, gobrawl!
338.03+Variants: {FnF, Vkg, JCM: line is not indented} | {Png: line is indented}
338.03+Latin germanus: full brother
338.03+German Ehren: honours
338.03+Anglo-Irish Erin: Ireland
338.03+Irish go bráth: until Judgement Day, forever
338.03+brawl
338.04     A public plouse. Citizen soldiers.
338.04+{{Synopsis: II.3.4.A: [338.04-340.03]: the dialogue of Butt and Taff begins — Butt describes the Russian General}}
338.04+place
338.04+applause
338.04+house
338.04+Irish Citizen Army (1916)
338.04+(the 'Citizen' in Kiernan's (James Joyce: Ulysses))
338.05     TAFF (a smart boy, of the peat freers, thirty two eleven, looking
338.05+(five dialogue cycles, each followed by an interpolation in square brackets ([341.18-342.32] [345.34-346.13] [349.06-350.09] [353.22-.32] [355.01-.07]))
338.05+Motif: Butt/Taff (*C*/*V*) [.09] [.11]
338.05+(*V*)
338.05+Amaro taff: buttocks [.11]
338.05+(peat is brown)
338.05+French péter: to fart
338.05+Pied Friars: mendicant order prior to 1245
338.05+White Friars: Carmelites
338.05+(thirty-two years, eleven months old)
338.05+10:30 pm (beginning of television show)
338.05+Motif: 1132
338.05+(looks up exepecting thunderstorm)
338.06through the roof towards a relevution of the karmalife order privious
338.06+revelation
338.06+revolution
338.06+elevation
338.06+Sanskrit karma: action, occupation
338.06+Carmelite Order
338.06+Carmelite Order (Saint John of the Cross led a reform of the Carmelite Order which resulted in the formation of the Discalced Carmelites [.13])
338.06+calmer
338.06+privy
338.06+previous
338.06+(umber is brown)
338.07to his hoisting of an emergency umberolum in byway of paraguastical
338.07+umbrella
338.07+by way of
338.07+Spanish paraguas: umbrella
338.07+Paraguay: a shrub from whose leaves a tea-like infusion (solution) is made
338.07+paraphrastical
338.08solation to the rhyttel in his hedd). All was flashing and krashning
338.08+solatium: compensation
338.08+Spanish solazo: heat of the sun
338.08+solution
338.08+rhyme
338.08+Welsh rhyfel: war
338.08+German rütteln: to shake
338.08+rattle
338.08+riddle
338.08+writing
338.08+Welsh hedd: peace
338.08+head
338.08+(stormy weather)
338.08+Russian krasnyi: red
338.09blurty moriartsky blutcherudd? What see, buttywalch? Tell ever
338.09+blurting
338.09+Bloody Mary
338.09+Russian moriak: sailor
338.09+General Blücher (Battle of Waterloo)
338.09+butcher-red [063.16]
338.09+bloody red
338.09+what do you see?
338.09+what say?
338.09+what's he?
338.09+Butt [.05]
338.09+Dublin Slang butty: drinking companion
338.09+William Walsh: Archbishop of Dublin from 1885 to 1921 (including during the Parnell adultery scandal)
338.09+bloody watch
338.09+television [.14]
338.10so often?
338.10+
338.11     BUTT (mottledged youth, clergical appealance, who, as his pied
338.11+Motif: Butt/Taff (*C*/*V*) [.05] [.12]
338.11+(*C*)
338.11+Colloquial butt: buttocks [.05]
338.11+mottled
338.11+motley
338.11+middleaged
338.11+clerical appearance
338.11+appeal
338.11+French pied: foot
338.11+[.05]
338.11+White
338.12friar, is supposing to motto the sorry dejester in tifftaff toffiness or
338.12+supposed to model
338.12+opposing
338.12+tomorrow
338.12+(relate)
338.12+digester
338.12+disaster
338.12+jester
338.12+Apocrypha: Sirach 8:4: 'Jest not with a rude man, lest thy ancestors be disgraced'
338.12+Motif: mishe/tauf ('mishe' portion seems to be missing)
338.12+Taff [.11]
338.12+Slang toffee-nose: a stuck-up person
338.13to be digarced from ever and a daye in his accounts). But da. But
338.13+disgraced
338.13+discalced [.06]
338.13+French garce: slut
338.13+arse
338.13+and to die
338.13+Buddha
338.13+Russian da: yes
338.13+German Dialect da: there
338.14dada, mwilshsuni. Till even so aften. Sea vaast a pool!
338.14+Dada movement
338.14+(father)
338.14+Shelta mwil: I
338.14+Shelta mwilsa: me
338.14+Shelta suni: see
338.14+television [.09]
338.14+ever so often
338.14+eleven, ten
338.14+Robert Burns: song 'Flow gently, sweet Afton'
338.14+Danish aften: evening
338.14+Black Sea (Crimea) and black pool (origin of the name Dublin)
338.14+Sevastopol (Crimea)
338.14+cesspool [.15]
338.14+vast
338.14+the name Dublin derives from Irish dubh linn: black pool
338.15     TAFF (porumptly helping himself out by the cesspull with a yellup
338.15+promptly
338.15+rump
338.15+out of the cesspool [.14]
338.15+yell
338.15+yellow
338.16yurrup, puts up his furry furzed hare). Butly bitly! Humme to our
338.16+you're up
338.16+Europe
338.16+VI.C.11.042i (b): === VI.B.17.052j ( ): 'put up a hare'
338.16+One Hundred Merrie and Delightsome Stories, story 52: 'he, being fond of amusement, was in the fields, and his dogs put up a hare'
338.16+phrase put up a hare: put forward a point
338.16+Anglo-Irish furry: furzy
338.16+very first hair (puberty)
338.16+German Furz: fart
338.16+hare (Cluster: Rabbits)
338.16+hat
338.16+Butt
338.16+Billy Butlin: famous proprietor of English holiday-camps
338.16+Billy Budd
338.16+Variants: {FnF, Vkg, JCM: ...bitly! Humme...} | {Png: ...bitly. Humme...}
338.16+Norwegian humme: move backwards
338.16+hum
338.16+French homme: man
338.16+Verdi: Il Trovatore: song Ai nostri monti: song Home to Our Mountains
338.16+Mohammed and the mountain
338.17mounthings. Conscribe him tillusk, unt, in his jubalant tubalence,
338.17+mounting
338.17+mouthings
338.17+French Slang con: female genitalia
338.17+conscript
338.17+describe him to us
338.17+Norwegian til: to
338.17+Shelta talosk: today
338.17+Middle English lusk: lazy
338.17+Slang cunt: female genitalia
338.17+German und: and
338.17+Motif: Ondt/Gracehoper
338.17+Cain's descendants Jubal and Tubal
338.17+jubilant tumescence
338.17+turbulence
338.18the groundsapper, with his soilday site out on his moulday side
338.18+soil
338.18+soldier
338.18+song Brian O'Linn: (had breeches with) 'The skinny side out and the woolly side in'
338.18+Sunday suit
338.18+and
338.18+mould
338.18+Monday
338.18+German Seiden: silks
338.19in. The gubernier-gerenal in laut-lievtonant of Baltiskeeamore,
338.19+Russian guberniya: province
338.19+Latin gubernator: steersman
338.19+Swedish gubbe: old man
338.19+governor-general and lord-lieutenant of Baltimore (County Cork)
338.19+Greek geras: old age
338.19+Spanish gerente: manager, boss
338.19+in-law
338.19+German laut: loud
338.19+French lièvre: hare (Cluster: Rabbits)
338.19+Russian lev: lion
338.19+tonant: Latin tonans: thundering
338.19+Russian Baltiiskoe more: Baltic Sea
338.19+Italian amore: love
338.20amaltheouse for leporty hole! Endues paramilintary langdwage.
338.20+Latin Cornu Amalthae: horn of plenty
338.20+Amaltheia: foster-mother and nurse of Zeus, represented as a goat suckling Zeus in a cave (her broken-off horn became cornucopia)
338.20+Amalteo: Italian family with three famous brothers (appearing in 1627 poem 'Trium Fratrum Amaltheorum Carmina')
338.20+malt-house
338.20+Latin lepus: hare (Cluster: Rabbits)
338.20+English gunboat shelled Liberty Hall, Dublin, during 1916 Easter Rising
338.20+Liberty Hall (opera by Dibdin)
338.20+porthole
338.20+Slang porthole: pudend
338.20+part and whole
338.20+and use parliamentary language
338.20+military
338.21The saillils of the yellavs nocadont palignol urdlesh. Shelltoss
338.21+Irish sail: willow
338.21+French saillir: gush out, spurt out
338.21+lilies of the valleys don't (speak Shelta)
338.21+yellow
338.21+Czech noc a den: night and day
338.21+Pali and Urdu
338.21+French parler: to speak
338.21+Shelta Sheldru: Shelta
338.21+Shelta
338.21+she'll, we'll, they'll
338.21+song Father O'Flynn: 'Sláinte and sláinte and sláinte again'
338.21+German Welt: world
338.22and welltass and telltuss aghom! Sling Stranaslang, how Malo-
338.22+TASS: Soviet news agency (Russian Telegrafnoe agentsvo Sovetskogo Soyuza: Telegraph Agency of the Soviet Union)
338.22+tell us
338.22+Irish Ogham writing
338.22+Variants: {FnF, Vkg, JCM: ...aghom! Sling...} | {Png: ...aghom. Sling...}
338.22+Slang sling slang: to abuse
338.22+Russian strana: country, region, area
338.22+Italian strana: strange (feminine)
338.22+Czech strana: political party
338.22+Dutch slang: snake, serpent
338.22+language
338.22+Italian malora: ruin
338.22+Russian Malorossiya: Little Russia (term used by Muscovites for Ukraine)
338.23razzias spikes her, coining a speak a spake! Not the Setanik stuff
338.23+Italian razzia: raid
338.23+speaks it, calling a spade a spade
338.23+coining (an expression)
338.23+(present and past tenses)
338.23+Archaic spake: spoke (past tense)
338.23+Set (Egyptian evil god)
338.23+Italian seta: silk, stuff
338.23+Setanta: Cuchulainn's original name
338.23+Armenian Satenik (woman's name)
338.23+Sathenik: semi-mythical 1st century Armenian queen
338.23+satanic
338.23+Russian sotnik: captain of a group of (originally 100) soldiers
338.23+Nick
338.24that slimed soft Siranouche! The good old gunshop monowards
338.24+Cyrano de Bergerac
338.24+Armenian Siranouche (woman's name)
338.24+Scaramouche: a roguish buffoon stock-character in the commedia dell'arte and in Punch and Judy shows
338.24+gun-ship
338.24+gin-shop words
338.24+monosyllabic words (swearing; Chinese)
338.24+man-o'-war
338.25for manosymples. Tincurs tammit! They did oak hay doe fou
338.25+many symbols
338.25+monosyllables
338.25+monosyllable: euphemism for 'cunt' (Slang cunt: female genitalia)
338.25+simple men
338.25+tincture
338.25+Irish tinkers used Shelta
338.25+Colloquial phrase tinker's curse
338.25+Colloquial phrase tinker's damn
338.25+Finnish tammi: oak
338.25+damn it!
338.25+auto-da-fé
338.25+okey doke for
338.25+O.K. though for
338.25+French fou: mad
338.26Chang-li-meng when that man d'airain was big top tom saw tip
338.26+Chinese ch'ang-li: usual procedure
338.26+change
338.26+Charlemagne
338.26+Chinese meng: dream
338.26+German mengen: to mix, mingle
338.26+mandarin
338.26+Man Of Aran: a documentary film on life on the Aran Islands by Robert J. Flaherty (1934)
338.26+Iron Duke: epithet of Wellington
338.26+French airain: brass
338.26+Anglo-Irish Erin: Ireland
338.26+(circus tent)
338.26+Pidgin topside: superior
338.26+Mark Twain: other works: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
338.26+saw-pit
338.27side bum boss pageantfiller. Ajaculate! All lea light! Rassamble
338.27+page-filler
338.27+pagan
338.27+French géant: giant
338.27+French fille: daughter
338.27+killer
338.27+Ajax
338.27+a jakes
338.27+ejaculate
338.27+all the night
338.27+all right (Pidgin)
338.27+French rassembler: to reassemble
338.27+resemble
338.27+Thomas Moore: Irish Melodies: song War Song: Remember the Glories of Brien the Brave [air: Molly MacAlpin] (about Brian Boru) [.29]
338.28the glowrings of Bruyant the Bref when the Mollies Makehal-
338.28+French bruyant: noisy
338.28+Bruin: a quasi-proper name applied to the bear (for example in the Reynard cycle)
338.28+French bref: brief
338.28+Danish bref: letter
338.28+(halfpenny whores)
338.28+Dublin Slang make: halfpenny
338.29pence took his leg for his thumb. And may he be too an intrepida-
338.29+maybe
338.29+in trepidation
338.29+Freud: The Interpretation of Dreams
338.29+'Terror of the Danes': epithet of Brian Boru [.27]
338.30tion of our dreams which we foregot at wiking when the morn
338.30+forgot
338.30+waking
338.30+Viking
338.30+song The Moon Hath Raised Her Lamp Above
338.31hath razed out limpalove and the bleakfrost chilled our ravery!
338.31+(erection)
338.31+our
338.31+Motif: dove/raven
338.31+breakfast killed our revery
338.31+Variants: {FnF, Vkg, JCM: ...ravery! Pook...} | {Png: ...ravery. Pook...}
338.32Pook. Sing ching lew mang! Upgo, bobbycop! Lets hear in
338.32+Charlemagne
338.32+gentleman
338.32+Russian OGPU: Obedinennoe Gosudarstvennoe Politicheskoe Upravlenie: United State Political Administration (Russian secret police, 1922-1934)
338.32+Slang bobby: policeman
338.32+Bobrikoff, Russian Governor-General of Finland, shot on 16/6/1904 (James Joyce: Ulysses.7.602)
338.32+German Bubikopf: bobbed hair style
338.32+Slang poppycock; nonsense
338.32+Slang cop: policeman
338.32+let's herein
338.32+Thomas Moore: Irish Melodies: song Let Erin Remember the Days of Old [.36]
338.33remember the braise of. Hold!
338.33+French braise: embers
338.33+praise
338.34     BUTT (drawling forth from his blousom whereis meditabound of
338.34+drawing
338.34+French blouson: battledress blouse, a jacket shaped like a blouse
338.34+bosom
338.34+Italian meditabondo: thoughtful, pensive
338.35his minkerstary, switches on his gorsecopper's fling weitoheito lang-
338.35+Shelta Minker's tari: Shelta
338.35+Ruthenian svichky: candles, lights
338.35+grasshopper's
338.35+German weiter: onward
338.35+whitehot lantern
338.35+German heiter: cheerful, merry
338.35+German lang: long
338.36thorn, fed up the grain oils of Aerin, while his laugh neighs banck as
338.36+fed on
338.36+green isles
338.36+hills of Erin
338.36+Thomas Moore: Irish Melodies: song Let Erin Remember the Days of Old: 'On Lough Neagh's bank, as the fisherman strays' [.32]
338.36+back


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