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Collection last updated: Jun 4 2021
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Finnegans Wake lines: 36
Elucidations found: 108

386.01lovely tint, embellished by the charms of art and very well con-
386.01+VI.B.25.158a (r): 'Nature embellished the tint'
386.01+Thomas Moore: Irish Melodies: song War Song: Remember the Glories of Brien the Brave: 'Mononia! when Nature embellish'd the tint Of thy fields'
386.02ducted and nicely mannered and all the horrid rudy noisies locked
386.02+Rudy Bloom (James Joyce: Ulysses)
386.02+Slang ruddy: bloody, damn
386.02+noises
386.03up in nasty cubbyhole!) as tired as they were, the three jolly
386.03+cubbyhole: small, confined room or closet
386.03+The Three Jolly Topers: Dublin pub
386.04topers, with their mouths watering, all the four, the old connu-
386.04+The Old Man of the Sea
386.04+VI.B.1.114g (r): 'connubial'
386.05bial men of the sea, yambing around with their old pantometer,
386.05+iambic pentameters
386.05+pantometer: instrument for measuring angles and distance, and taking deviations
386.06in duckasaloppics, Luke and Johnny MacDougall and all wishen-
386.06+duck trousers
386.06+decasyllabics
386.06+Salop: Shropshire
386.06+French salopette: overall, dungarees
386.06+French salopard: scoundrel
386.06+wishing
386.07ing for anything at all of the bygone times, the wald times and
386.07+German Wald: wood, forest
386.08the fald times and the hempty times and the dempty times, for a
386.08+Danish falde: fall
386.08+nursery rhyme Humpty Dumpty
386.09cup of kindness yet, for four farback tumblerfuls of woman
386.09+song Auld Lang Syne: 'We'll tak a cup of kindness yet'
386.09+lemon squash
386.10squash, with them, all four, listening and spraining their ears for
386.10+straining
386.11the millennium and all their mouths making water.
386.11+phrase making water: urinating
386.12     Johnny. Ah well, sure, that's the way (up) and it so happened
386.12+{{Synopsis: II.4.1+2.C: [386.12-388.09]: the story associated with Johnny MacDougall — rambling reminiscences}}
386.12+(four hiccups)
386.12+(*X* trying to get themselves, or the ass, up off the ground)
386.13there was poor Matt Gregory (up), their pater familias, and (up)
386.13+VI.B.1.117h (r): 'bastard from birth pater familias'
386.13+The Encyclopædia Britannica vol. XXIII, 'Roman Law', 530a: 'children born in lawful marriage followed the family of their father, while those who were illegitimate ranked from the moment of birth as patresfamilias and matresfamilias'
386.13+Latin pater familias: father of a family, patriarch [389.15] [391.10]
386.14the others and now really and (up) truly they were four dear
386.14+
386.15old heladies and really they looked awfully pretty and so nice and
386.15+he-ladies
386.16bespectable and after that they had their fathomglasses to find
386.16+bespectacled
386.16+respectable
386.17out all the fathoms and their half a tall hat, just now like the old
386.17+half a tall hat [387.03]
386.18Merquus of Pawerschoof, the old determined despot, (quiescents
386.18+marquess: title of nobility (two ranks higher than viscount)
386.18+Marcus
386.18+Viscount Powerscourt: the title of a family of Irish peers and politicians (Powerscourt House in South William Street, Dublin, was once their Dublin townhouse)
386.18+Latin equus: horse
386.18+paw: (of a horse) to scrape the ground with the hoofs
386.18+hoof
386.18+Danish hof: court
386.18+VI.B.1.116i (r): 'determined old'
386.18+VI.B.1.174f (r): 'despots (1 2 3)' ('1 2 3' not clear)
386.18+Latin quiescens in pace: resting in peace
386.19in brage!) only for the extrusion of the saltwater or the auctioneer
386.19+Italian brage: charcoal embers
386.19+Latin braga: knickers
386.19+Latin bracae: trousers
386.20there dormont, in front of the place near O'Clery's, at the darku-
386.20+dormant
386.20+French mont: mount, mountain
386.20+O'Clery: surname of two of the major compilers of Annals of the Four Masters (*X*)
386.20+Clerys: famous department store, O'Connell Street
386.20+dark mound
386.20+Document no. 1: the Treaty (name used by De Valera's followers) [390.29]
386.21mound numbur wan, beside that ancient Dame street, where the
386.21+Dublin Pronunciation numbur wan: number one
386.21+Dame Street, Dublin, runs towards Trinity College
386.22statue of Mrs Dana O'Connell, prostituent behind the Trinity
386.22+statue of Daniel O'Connell, O'Connell Street [.25]
386.22+Dana: mother-goddess of Tuatha Dé Danann
386.22+phrase pros and cons
386.23College, that arranges all the auctions of the valuable colleges,
386.23+Variants: {FnF, Vkg, JCM: ...colleges, Bootersbay...} | {Png: ...colleges. Bootersbay...}
386.24Bootersbay Sisters, like the auctioneer Battersby Sisters, the pru-
386.24+Booterstown: district of Dublin
386.24+Battersby Bros: Dublin auctioneers, Westmoreland Street [387.24]
386.24+promiscuous caterers
386.24+pumiceous craters
386.25misceous creaters, that sells all the emancipated statues and
386.25+creatures
386.25+VI.B.1.117b (r): 'emancipation'
386.25+The Encyclopædia Britannica vol. XXIII, 'Roman Law': repeatedly mentions 'emancipation' and 'mancipation' (e.g. 530a, 540c, 532c, 541d))
386.25+O'Connell was known as 'The Emancipator' [.22]
386.26flowersports, James H. Tickell, the jaypee, off Hoggin Green,
386.26+flowerpots
386.26+James H. North J.P., auctioneer and estate agent, 110 Grafton Street, Dublin
386.26+J.P.: justice of the peace
386.26+College Green, the site of the Norwegian Thingmote in Dublin, was called Hoggen Green in 10th century
386.27after he made the centuries, going to the tailturn horseshow, be-
386.27+century: 100 runs in cricket
386.27+sentries
386.27+Tailtean games in honour of Tailte, queen of the Firbolg
386.27+horse show (Dublin hosts a famous one annually since the mid 19th century)
386.28fore the angler nomads flood, along with another fellow, active
386.28+Anglo-Norman (invasion of Ireland)
386.28+Noah's flood
386.28+active and passive
386.29impalsive, and the shoeblacks and the redshanks and plebeians
386.29+impulsive
386.29+redshanks: one who has red legs, especially a Celtic inhabitant of the Scottish Highlands or Ireland (apparently in allusion to the colour of bare legs reddened by exposure); also, a red-stockinged person, especially a cardinal; also, various bird and plants
386.29+VI.B.1.097b (r): 'plebean' [387.15]
386.30and the barrancos and the cappunchers childerun, Jules, every-
386.30+Spanish barranco: ravine; (fig.) great difficulty
386.30+Italian Cappuccina: Capuchin nun
386.30+Motif: Archdeacon J.F.X.P. Coppinger
386.30+cowpunchers
386.30+children
386.30+French jules: chamber pot
386.30+French Slang jules: German
386.31one, Gotopoxy, with the houghers on them, highstepping the
386.31+Cotopaxi: volcano (in W.J. Turner's 'Romance')
386.31+Peep O'Day Boys called 'houghers' because they hamstrung enemies (hough: back of knee)
386.31+hours
386.31+(don't step on cracks in pavement)
386.32fissure and fracture lines, seven five threes up, three five
386.32+[616.09] [616.34] [620.04]
386.33sevens down, to get out of his way, onasmuck as their withers
386.33+inasmuch as the weather
386.33+horse's withers
386.34conditions could not possibly have been improved upon,
386.34+
386.35(praisers be to deeseesee!) like hopolopocattls, erumping oround
386.35+praises
386.35+deep sleep sea [037.18]
386.35+Dublin City Corporation (D.C.C.)
386.35+Mount Popocatepetl: volcano (in W.J. Turner's 'Romance')
386.35+Latin erumpo: I break out
386.35+erupting around
386.36their Judgity Yaman, and all the tercentenary horses and priest-
386.36+Latin jugiter: perpetually
386.36+Fujiyama: volcano
386.36+Japanese yama: mountain
386.36+Yama: Indian god who rules spirits of the dead
386.36+Chinese Yamen: mandarin's office; hence, any public service department
386.36+tercentenary: pertaining to 300 years or the 300th anniversary (the Tercentary of Trinity College was in 1892)
386.36+priest-hunters claimed bounty on priests under the Penal Laws in 17th and 18th century Ireland


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