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Collection last updated: Jun 4 2021
Engine last updated: May 18 2021
Finnegans Wake lines: 36
Elucidations found: 116

556.01     night by silentsailing night while infantina Isobel (who will be
556.01+{{Synopsis: III.4.4A.B: [556.01-556.22]: night by night — while Isobel quietly sleeps in her cot}}
556.01+Variants: {FnF, Vkg, JCM: night...} | {Png: Night...}
556.01+night by night [555.05] [.23] [.31] [557.13] [558.21]
556.01+(rhythm of William Byrd's song 'The Woods So Wild' [.16])
556.01+infanta: a daughter of the king of Spain or Portugal
556.01+*I*
556.01+(going to be a nun)
556.02blushing all day to be, when she growed up one Sunday,
556.02+grew up
556.03Saint Holy and Saint Ivory, when she took the veil, the
556.03+song The Holly and the Ivy
556.03+VI.B.5.060g (g): 'took the veil'
556.04beautiful presentation nun, so barely twenty, in her pure coif,
556.04+Presentation Order of nuns
556.05sister Isobel, and next Sunday, Mistlemas, when she looked
556.05+mistletoe
556.05+Michaelmas
556.06a peach, the beautiful Samaritan, still as beautiful and still
556.06+
556.07in her teens, nurse Saintette Isabelle, with stiffstarched cuffs but
556.07+VI.B.17.042g (b): 'saintette'
556.08on Holiday, Christmas, Easter mornings when she wore a wreath,
556.08+HCE (Motif: HCE)
556.08+song She Wore a Wreath of Roses the Night That First We Met [.13]
556.09the wonderful widow of eighteen springs, Madame Isa Veuve La
556.09+VI.B.7.212d (g): 'Widow MacD— Kirsty — Ishabel —'
556.09+Kennedy-Fraser & Macleod: Songs of the Hebrides II.xv: 'The singers from whom in the main we collected in Eigg, were three women — Widow Macdonald (who was over ninety) and two others, also widows, Ishabel Macleod and Kirsty Mackinnon'
556.09+Isa Bowman: child-friend of Lewis Carroll and author of Bowman: The Story of Lewis Carroll
556.09+French veuve: widow
556.09+Isolde la Belle
556.10Belle, so sad but lucksome in her boyblue's long black with
556.10+lissom
556.10+buxom
556.10+nursery rhyme Little Boy Blue
556.11orange blossoming weeper's veil) for she was the only girl they
556.11+(orange blossom for wedding)
556.12loved, as she is the queenly pearl you prize, because of the way
556.12+Matthew 13:46: 'Pearl of great price'
556.13the night that first we met she is bound to be, methinks, and not
556.13+song O Song of Songs: 'Do you recall the night that first we met'
556.14in vain, the darling of my heart, sleeping in her april cot, within
556.14+song Sally in our Alley: 'She is the darling of my heart'
556.14+apricot
556.15her singachamer, with her greengageflavoured candywhistle
556.15+Danish sengekammer: bedroom (from Danish seng: bed and Danish kammer: room)
556.15+chamber
556.16duetted to the crazyquilt, Isobel, she is so pretty, truth to tell,
556.16+(stuck)
556.17wildwood's eyes and primarose hair, quietly, all the woods so
556.17+William Byrd: song 'Shall I go walk the woods so wild, Wand'ring, wand'ring here and there, As I was once full sore beguiled, Alas! for love! I die with woe'
556.17+primrose; pale yellow
556.18wild, in mauves of moss and daphnedews, how all so still she lay,
556.18+daphne: kind of laurel, bay
556.18+daffodils
556.18+song I sing of a maiden that is makeless: 'He came al so stille'
556.19neath of the whitethorn, child of tree, like some losthappy leaf,
556.19+
556.20like blowing flower stilled, as fain would she anon, for soon again
556.20+
556.21'twill be, win me, woo me, wed me, ah weary me! deeply, now
556.21+Motif: 4-stage Viconian cycle (?)
556.22evencalm lay sleeping;
556.22+
556.23     nowth upon nacht, while in his tumbril Wachtman Havelook
556.23+{{Synopsis: III.4.4B.A: [556.23-556.30]: night by night — while the constable does his rounds on schedule, collecting lost items}}
556.23+Variants: {FnF, Vkg, JCM: nowth...} | {Png: now...}
556.23+night upon night [555.05] [.01] [.31] [557.13] [558.21]
556.23+Howth
556.23+German Nacht: night
556.23+De Nachtwacht: Rembrandt's most famous painting (Dutch 'The Night Guard')
556.23+Variants: {FnF, Vkg, JCM: ...nacht, while...} | {Png: ...nacht while...}
556.23+tumbril: a cart so constructed that the body tilts backwards to empty out the load, especially a dung-cart
556.23+German wacht: guards, wakes
556.23+watchman (*S*)
556.23+have a look
556.23+Havelok the Dane: a 13th century poem, with a narrative very similar to that of William Shakespeare: Hamlet (Hamlet and Havelok are cognates [084.33])
556.23+Havelock Ellis: 19th-20th century pioneering British sexologist (especially famous for his books on homosexuality)
556.24seequeerscenes, from yonsides of the choppy, punkt by his
556.24+sees queer scenes
556.24+Latin sequester: umpire, mediator
556.24+Sackerson
556.24+Colloquial queer: homosexual
556.24+German Punkt: point, period
556.24+punctual
556.24+(exactly)
556.25curserbog, went long the grassgross bumpinstrass that henders
556.25+German Kursbuch: train schedule
556.25+VI.B.14.098l (g): 'the grassgrown strass that henders the pubbel to pass,' ('grassgrown strass' replaces a cancelled 'strass')
556.25+VI.B.14.101h (g): 'roads made to prevent people from passing'
556.25+German groß: big
556.25+bumping
556.25+German Straße: street
556.25+Norwegian hende: to happen
556.25+hinders
556.26the pubbel to pass, stowing his bottle in a hole for at whet his
556.26+pub
556.26+Irish pobal: people, public
556.26+German Pöbel: rabble
556.26+French poubelle: dust bin
556.26+Danish for at: in order to
556.26+phrase wet his whistle
556.27whuskle to stretch ecrooksman, sequestering for lovers' lost pro-
556.27+French escroquerie: fraud
556.27+(drinking up dregs [380.07])
556.27+lost property office
556.28pertied offices the leavethings from allpurgers' night, og gneiss
556.28+leavings
556.28+Walpurgis Night
556.28+Danish og: and
556.28+gneiss: a metamorphic rock
556.28+nice
556.29ogas gnasty, kikkers, brillers, knappers and bands, handsboon
556.29+Irish agus: and
556.29+nasty
556.29+Danish kikkert: binoculars
556.29+Danish briller: eyegalsses
556.29+Danish knapper: buttons
556.29+Danish baand: ribbons
556.29+Danish handsker: German Handschuhe: gloves
556.30and strumpers, sminkysticks and eddiketsflaskers;
556.30+Danish strømper: stockings
556.30+Danish sminke: rouge, makeup
556.30+Danish eddikeflasker: vinegar bottles
556.30+German Etikett: bottle-label
556.31     wan fine night and the next fine night and last find night while
556.31+{{Synopsis: III.4.4C.A: [556.31-557.12]: night by night — while Kothereen recites into her pillow how she found the publican crawling naked downstairs}}
556.31+Chinese wan: ten thousand; a large number
556.31+Dublin Pronunciation wan: one
556.31+night and night [555.05] [.01] [.23] [557.13] [558.21]
556.31+fine
556.32Kothereen the Slop in her native's chambercushy, with dreamings
556.32+German Kot: dirt, filth
556.32+*K*
556.32+French chambre à coucher: bedroom
556.33of simmering my veal astore, was basquing to her pillasleep how
556.33+Irish mo mhíle stór: my thousand treasures (endearment)
556.33+Basque language [557.01]
556.33+basking on her pillow
556.33+pillowslip
556.34she thawght a knogg came to the dowanstairs dour at that howr
556.34+thought a knock came at the downstairs door at that hour
556.34+Anglo-Irish Pronunciation dour: door
556.35to peirce the yare and dowandshe went, schritt be schratt, to see
556.35+Motif: Persse O'Reilly
556.35+pierce the air
556.35+down she went
556.35+German Schritt: step
556.35+German Schrat: imp, hobgoblin
556.36was it Schweeps's mingerals or Shuhorn the posth with a tilly-
556.36+Schweppes mineral waters
556.36+Latin mingere: to urinate
556.36+Shaun the Post
556.36+posh
556.36+Anglo-Irish tilly: an extra measure, 13th to the dozen
556.36+telegram


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