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Collection last updated: Jun 4 2021
Engine last updated: May 18 2021
Finnegans Wake lines: 36
Elucidations found: 138

567.01leary obelisk via the rock vhat myles knox furlongs; to the
567.01+French Slang obelisque: penis
567.01+Blackrock
567.01+eight miles no furlongs
567.01+knots
567.02general's postoffice howsands of patience; to the Wellington
567.02+General Post Office, O'Connell Street
567.02+thousands of paces
567.02+Wellington Monument: obelisk in Phoenix Park
567.03memorial half a league wrongwards; to Sara's bridge good hun-
567.03+Alfred Lord Tennyson: The Charge of the Light Brigade i: 'Half a league onwards' (a league is about three miles)
567.03+Sarah Bridge, Dublin
567.03+hundred and ninety metres
567.04ter and nine to meet her: to the point, one yeoman's yard. He, he,
567.04+Slang pointer: penis
567.04+Gilbert and Sullivan: Yeomen of the Guard
567.04+Archaic yard: penis
567.05he! At that do you leer, a setting up? With a such unfettered belly?
567.05+at what
567.05+Spanish leer: to read [566.35-.36]
567.05+Budge: The Book of the Dead lxix: (of the setting up of the Tet) 'the solemn ceremony of setting up of the... backbone of Osiris, was performed each year' [.06] [.09]
567.05+German mit einem solch: with such an (literally 'with a such')
567.06Two cascades? I leer (O my big, O my bog, O my bigbagbone!)
567.06+Spanish leer: to read [566.35-.36]
567.06+O, my back [213.17]
567.06+Russian o moi bog: o my God
567.06+Variants: {FnF, Vkg, JCM: ...bigbagbone...} | {Png: ...bagbone...}
567.06+backbone
567.07because I must see a buntingcap of so a pinky on the point. It is
567.07+VI.B.14.181f (o): 'Old Hunting Cap (O'Connell)'
567.07+Gwynn: Munster 38: 'The builder of Darrynane... was a Daniel or Donal who married a daughter of the O'Donoghues — another great Kerry clan. This lady — Máire Dubh — was a fruitful mother of children — she bore twenty-two of them and brought twelve to full age; but she was also notable as a poetess in the Irish tongue. Her second son, Maurice, inherited Darrynane, and was known all over the country as Hunting Cap O'Connell, for a tax was put on beaver hats, and from that day he wore nothing but the velvet cap in which he was used to hunt hare and fox on the mountains of Iveragh. Daniel O'Connell, his nephew, was a great votary of that sport, and I have talked with a man who had hunted in his company'
567.07+(condom)
567.07+fox hunters' red coats are called 'pink'
567.08for a true glover's greetings and many burgesses by us, greats
567.08+Russian glavar': leader; gangleader, ringleader (usually pejorative)
567.08+lover's meeting [540.31]
567.08+Oxford Colloquial greats: final B.A. examination (especially for Honours in Litteræ Humaniores)
567.08+great gross: twelve gross
567.09and grosses, uses to pink it in this way at tet-at-tet. For long has
567.09+German Großes: a big thing
567.09+Tet: upright tree trunk containing or representing body of Osiris (Budge: The Book of the Dead liv) [.05]
567.09+French tête-à-tête: private conversation
567.10it been effigy of standard royal when broken on roofstaff which
567.10+sacred roof tree, symbol of Osiris [025.13]
567.11to the gunnings shall cast welcome from Courtmilits' Fortress,
567.11+The Gunnings: two 18th century Irish sisters who married English aristocrats [495.25]
567.11+German König: king
567.11+Irish céad míle fáilte: a hundred thousand welcomes (traditional Irish greeting)
567.12umptydum dumptydum. Bemark you these hangovers, those
567.12+nursery rhyme Humpty Dumpty
567.12+dum-dum bullet: a bullet designed to expand on impact (first developed at the Dum Dum Arsenal in India, 1896)
567.12+Dutch bemerk je: do you notice?
567.12+Hanover, Royal house
567.13streamer fields, his influx. Do you not have heard that, the queen
567.13+on the visit of George IV to Dublin, in 1821, the Queen was dying and remained in England, while contrary winds caused the Royal Party to turn back to Holyhead on the first attempt to cross the Irish sea [566.36] [.25] [568.23]
567.13+VI.C.5.199g (b): === VI.B.17.041a ( ): 'the quean *A*'
567.13+One Hundred Merrie and Delightsome Stories, story 1: (of a man coveting his neighbour's wife) 'he found many and subtle manners of making the good comrade, the husband of the said quean, his private and familiar friend'
567.14lying abroad from fury of the gales, (meekname mocktitles her
567.14+VI.C.5.199h (b): === VI.B.17.041b ( ): 'lay abroad'
567.14+One Hundred Merrie and Delightsome Stories, story 1: (of a man coveting his neighbour's wife) 'she promised him that, whenever her husband lay abroad for a night, she would advise him thereof'
567.14+Gilbert and Sullivan: H.M.S. Pinafore: song 'I'm never known to quail At the fury of a gale And I'm never never sick at sea' (Captain Corcoran's song)
567.14+nickname
567.14+Mock Turtle: character in Lewis Carroll: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
567.15Nan Nan Nanetta) her liege of lateenth dignisties shall come on
567.15+song No, No, Nanette
567.15+Italian nanetta: little dwarf (feminine)
567.15+(the king)
567.15+late
567.15+lateen: triangular sail
567.15+18th dynasty (Budge: The Book of the Dead xli: 'In the... XVIIIth Dynasty... At this period the scribes began to onament their papyri with designs... or "vignettes"')
567.16their bay tomorrow, Michalsmas, mellems the third and fourth of
567.16+way
567.16+Michaelmas: 29 September
567.16+Danish mellem: between
567.17the clock, there to all the king's aussies and all their king's men,
567.17+nursery rhyme Humpty Dumpty: 'All the king's horses and all the king's men'
567.18knechts tramplers and cavalcaders, led of herald graycloak, Ulaf
567.18+German Knecht: Dutch knecht: servant, groom
567.18+Knights Templars
567.18+Harald Gray Cloak ruled West Norway
567.18+Olaf
567.19Goldarskield? Dog! Dog! Her lofts will be loosed for her and
567.19+Danish dog! dog!: German doch! doch!: o yes!
567.19+loft: flock of pigeons
567.19+locks
567.20their tumblers broodcast. A progress shall be made in walk, ney? I
567.20+tumbler: part of lock
567.20+Dutch brood: bread
567.20+Dutch broodkast: cupboard
567.20+broadcast
567.20+Work in Progress: Joyce's name for Finnegans Wake during composition
567.21trow it well, and uge by uge. He shall come, sidesmen accostant, by
567.21+Danish uge: week
567.21+sidesman: an assistant to a parish churchwarden or a municipal officer
567.21+Obsolete accost: to go alongside of
567.21+Heraldry accosted: placed side by side
567.22aryan jubilarian and on brigadier-general Nolan or and buccaneer-
567.22+jubilarian: priest or nun who has been so for fifty years
567.22+Brigadier-General Dennis E. Nolan: head of United States Intelligence, 1917-18
567.22+Motif: Browne/Nolan
567.22+Admiral William Brown: founder of Argentine Navy (born in County Mayo in 1777)
567.23admiral Browne, with — who can doubt it? — his golden beagles
567.23+
567.24and his white elkox terriers for a hunting on our littlego illcome
567.24+Luke Elcock: mayor of Drogheda, 1916 [031.18]
567.24+University Colloquial Little Go: first B.A. examination
567.24+Song of Solomon 2:15: 'The little foxes that spoil the vines'
567.24+income taxes
567.25faxes. In blue and buff of Beaufort the hunt shall make. It is
567.25+German Faxen: buffoonery
567.25+foxes
567.25+blue and buff: Whig colours
567.25+on George IV's procession to Dublin Castle during his Dublin visit, in 1821, persons on horseback were to wear 'Blue coat, with coronation button, buff, or white waistcoast' [566.36] [.13] [568.23]
567.25+Beaufort: an English hunt
567.25+Archaic beaufort: material used for flags
567.26poblesse noblige. Ommes will grin through collars when each
567.26+German Pöbel: rabble
567.26+Irish pobel: people
567.26+French phrase noblesse oblige: nobility has its obligations
567.26+French hommes: men
567.27riders other's ass. Me Eccls! What cats' killings overall! What
567.27+Latin Mehercule!: By Hercules!
567.27+Eccles Street, Dublin (Bloom's home address in James Joyce: Ulysses)
567.27+Rip Van Winkle slept under the Catskill Mountains
567.27+Danish kattekillinger overalt: pussycats all over the place
567.28popping out of guillotened widows! Quick time! Beware of
567.28+guillotine windows: sash windows (jocular)
567.29waiting! Squintina plies favours on us from her rushfrail and
567.29+
567.30Zosimus, the crowder, in his surcoat, sues us with souftwister.
567.30+Zozimus: Dublin bard and beggar
567.30+crooner
567.30+Welsh crwth: bowed lyre
567.30+Southwester wind
567.30+Southwester hat
567.31Apart we! Here are gantlets. I believe, by Plentifolks Mixymost!
567.31+Obsolete gantlet: gauntlet
567.31+Obsolete gantlet: gantlope, a military punishment in which the culprit had to run stripped to the waist between two rows of men who struck at him with a stick or a knotted cord (especially 'run the gantlet')
567.31+Latin Pontifex Maximus: high priest; pope
567.32Yet if I durst to express the hope how I might be able to be pre-
567.32+
567.33sent. All these peeplers entrammed and detrained on bikeygels
567.33+peepers
567.33+people
567.33+entrapped
567.33+trams and trains
567.33+detained
567.33+(*IJ* and *VYC*)
567.33+bicycles
567.33+girls
567.34and troykakyls and those puny farting little solitires! Tollacre,
567.34+Russian troika: the numeral three; three horses harnessed abreast
567.34+tricycles
567.34+German Kerl: fellow
567.34+penny farthings: old bicycles with one large and one small wheel (and solid tyres)
567.34+German Fahrt: journey
567.34+solitaire
567.35tollacre! Polo north will beseem Sibernian and Plein Pelouta will
567.35+polo (Cluster: Ball Games)
567.35+James Joyce: Letters I.57: letter 31/12/04 to Mrs William Murray (Aunt Josephine): 'Pola is a back-of-God-speed place - a naval Siberia - 37 men o'war in the harbour'
567.35+North Pole
567.35+Siberian
567.35+Hibernian
567.35+playing
567.35+pelota (Cluster: Ball Games)
567.36behowl ne yerking at lawncastrum ne ghimbelling on guelflinks.
567.36+behold
567.36+bowls (Cluster: Ball Games)
567.36+yerk: lash, jerk
567.36+yorker (cricket) (Cluster: Ball Games)
567.36+York and Lancaster (War of Roses)
567.36+lawn tennis (Cluster: Ball Games)
567.36+Latin castrum: fort
567.36+Latin ne... ne: neither... nor
567.36+Ghibellines and Guelphs: rival factions in medieval Italy, supporting the Holy Roman Emperor and the Pope, respectively (Dante aligned himself with the Guelphs)
567.36+gambolling
567.36+gambling on golflinks (Cluster: Ball Games)


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